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GymInfo - FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

1. How is the Regional Qualifying Score (RQS), National Qualifying Average (NQA) and Seasonal Average Score (SAS) computed?

Men
NCAA National Qualifying Average: Select the four highest scores, one of which must be a 5 up / 5 count score, counting no more than two home meets.  The highest of these four scores will be replaced with the conference championship meet score.  These four scores will be averaged to determine the NQA.

In 2012, the NQA was computed by selecting the four highest scores, counting no more than two home meets. The highest of these four scores will be replaced with the conference championship meet score. These four scores will be averaged to determine the NQA.

In 2011, the NQA was computed by selecting the five highest scores, counting no more than two home meets. The highest of these five scores will be replaced with the conference championship meet score counting twice. These six scores will be averaged to determine the NQA. For an individual, his score in the conference event finals can replace a regular season score. Earlier in the season, a three score average is used. This is an average of the three highest regular-season scores, regardless of competition location.

In years prior to 2011, the NQA was computed by selecting the four highest regular-season scores, counting no more than two home meets, and the highest of these scores will be dropped.  The conference meet score will be doubled and added to the three remaining regular-season scores.  The average of these five scores, which includes the doubled conference score, will be the national qualifying average."  (The conference score will count 40% and the regular season scores will count 60%).

Women
Qualification for regional competition is based on a team's and an all-around competitor's six best regular-season-meet scores, of which three must be away. To obtain the regional qualifying score (RQS), the high score is eliminated and the remaining five scores are averaged.
Division III uses the SAS which is computed by averaging the best home score, the two best away scores, and then the next highest score.

2. What is RPI and SOS (also OWP and OOWP)?

The Ratings Percentage Index (RPI) is a very common system of comparing teams used in many NCAA sports.  By definition: it is a measure of strength of schedule and how a team does against that schedule.  The formula used for RPI is 25% your winning percentage (WP), 50% your opponents winning percentage (OWP), and 25% your opponents opponents winning percentage (OOWP).  With RPI, the only criteria used is wins and losses, the scores (what the RQS is based purely on) are not factored in at all.

For gymnastics, there is one modification to the standard RPI:  Because you can compete against more than one team at a single meet, no one score is worth more than one win.  For example, if a team wins a quad meet (3 other teams), they do not receive three wins, only one.  The team that finished second at that quad meet would receive 2/3 (0.66) wins.  The third place team 1/3 (0.33) wins, etc.

Strength of schedule (SOS) is a relative comparison for teams that may or may not play each other during the regular season.  SOS is fluid and will change throughout the season.  The formula used is: ((2*OWP) + (OOWP))/3.  The SOS is an essential part of the RPI equation, and like the RPI, it’s only criteria is wins and losses.

3. Why does it take so long to get results from some teams? Why does a team not have any information in the system? Why is a recent score not reflected in the current ranking?

Each school is responsible to enter their own information into the system. Some teams put more of a priority on it than others. All schools that sponsor a team are encouraged to enter their information on this system.

Rankings are run once a week according to the schedule set by the respective coaches association. For Women, the deadline for entering scores into the system is 9pm CST Sunday evenings, and rankings will be available by 8am CST Monday mornings. For Men, the deadline for entering scores is 6pm CST Monday evenings with rankings available by 8am CST Tuesday mornings.

4. When will the rankings be updated again?

Rankings are tabulated weekly, Men on Monday evening, Women on Monday morning. 

5. How do Women's teams and individuals qualify to a Regional Championship?

Championships Structure
The National Collegiate Women's Gymnastics Championships will consist of 12 teams and 12 all-around competitors (who are not on a qualifying team) and event specialists. Regional competition consisting of six teams and five all-around competitors (who are not on a qualifying team), and one individual specialist per event [who has a minimum regional  qualifying score (RQS) of 9.4] will be conducted in each of six regions to determine the participants in the national championships. The top two teams and the all-around winner from each regional will receive an automatic berth to the national championships. The remaining all around competitors will qualify on the basis of rank order of finish (highest score) from all the regional championships. If the all around winner in a region is on an advancing team, that position will revert to an at-large berth. In addition, the event winners at the regional championships who score at least a 9.8 may advance to the national championships (in that event only) if they are not part of a qualifying team or the all-around qualifiers. The six regions are numbered one to six.
Order of Events. Preliminary team and all-around competition will be conducted in two sessions on Day 1. The top three teams from each session will advance to the Super Six competition on Day 2. The top four individuals from each session in each event (plus ties) from the preliminary team and all-around competition will compete in the individual-event competition on Day 3.

Qualification Procedures
Qualification for regional competition is based on a team's and an all-around competitor's and an individual event specialist's six best regular-season-meet scores, of which three must be away. To obtain the regional qualifying score (RQS), the high score is eliminated and the remaining five scores are averaged.

6. When and where are Regional and National competitions ?

Women: 
NCAA Regional and Final information is available here.

Men: 
NCAA Regional and Final information is available here.


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